Journal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics Close
 

Figure 4: The differences between the “radiative-matched” (a-c) and “impedance-matched” (d-f) capacitive solutions. The radiative solution calculated planar waves from the electrodes which are the initial beam (a) and it has reflected one in every layers of the target (b). The result is their addition (c). In case of an impedance-matched solution, we have to calculate the free charges in the electrolytes (real conduction current, d), but when it has no charge to conduct the current, only dipoles have identical but opposite charge fixed together; the conduction by free charges is impossible. However, then any way flows a current (called “displacement current,” e). The reality of biomatter that both existing, but the Joule heat is produced only by the conductive current (f). The displacement current also may produce heat by the movement, rotation, friction of the dipoles which are in the material

Figure 4: The differences between the “radiative-matched” (a-c) and “impedance-matched” (d-f) capacitive solutions. The radiative solution calculated planar waves from the electrodes which are the initial beam (a) and it has reflected one in every layers of the target (b). The result is their addition (c). In case of an impedance-matched solution, we have to calculate the free charges in the electrolytes (real conduction current, d), but when it has no charge to conduct the current, only dipoles have identical but opposite charge fixed together; the conduction by free charges is impossible. However, then any way flows a current (called “displacement current,” e). The reality of biomatter that both existing, but the Joule heat is produced only by the conductive current (f). The displacement current also may produce heat by the movement, rotation, friction of the dipoles which are in the material