Journal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2020  |  Volume : 16  |  Issue : 5  |  Page : 1151--1156

Magnetic resonance imaging-guided microwave ablation of hepatic malignancies: Feasibility, efficacy, safety, and follow-up


Nannan Yang1, Ju Gong1, Linyan Yao1, Chen Wang2, Jun Chen2, Jiangwen Liu2, Zhongmin Wang3, Jian Lu1 
1 Department of Radiology, Ruijin Hospital/Luwan Branch, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai, China
2 Department of Vascular and Interventional Radiology, The Third Affiliated Hospital, Shihezi University, Xinjiang, China
3 Department of Radiology, Ruijin Hospital/Luwan Branch, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai; Department of Vascular and Interventional Radiology, The Third Affiliated Hospital, Shihezi University, Xinjiang, China

Correspondence Address:
Zhongmin Wang
Jian Lu, Jiangwen Liu, Department of Radiology, Ruijin Hospital/Luwan Branch, School of Medicine,Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai; Department of Vascular and Interventional Radiology, The Third Affiliated Hospital, Shihezi University, Xinjiang
China

Context: Percutaneous image-guided thermal ablation has emerged as a valuable therapeutic approach for hepatic malignancies. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has shown potential for great soft-tissue resolution and multiplanar capabilities in arbitrary imaging planes, which are also critical for treatment planning, targeting, and evaluation. Aims: The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility, technical success, safety, and follow-up of hepatic malignancies treated with MRI-guided microwave ablation (MWA). Materials and Methods: MRI-guided MWA was performed in a closed-bore 1.5 T MR system. T1-weighted imaging was used as a monitoring tool during surgery. T2-weighted imaging was performed to obtain an adequate tumor margin, to calculate the tumor size. Multi-b-value diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) was performed postprocedurally. Enhanced MRI was performed at 4 weeks, to assess the technical success, and every 3–6 months as a follow-up. Results: Twenty-six patients (38 lesions) were enrolled in the study. A primary efficacy rate of 100% was achieved, and no major complications were observed. Two patient cohorts were identified based on lesion size. Six lesions with incomplete circles on reconstructed DWI appeared immediately postprocedure, and persistent hyperintense signals developed into new lesions over the subsequent 6–12 months. Conclusion: MRI-guided ablation is feasible and effective for planning and evaluating MWA in hepatic malignancies. The available clinical data strongly support the advantages of the assessment of tumors through 3D imaging versus routine axial images.


How to cite this article:
Yang N, Gong J, Yao L, Wang C, Chen J, Liu J, Wang Z, Lu J. Magnetic resonance imaging-guided microwave ablation of hepatic malignancies: Feasibility, efficacy, safety, and follow-up.J Can Res Ther 2020;16:1151-1156


How to cite this URL:
Yang N, Gong J, Yao L, Wang C, Chen J, Liu J, Wang Z, Lu J. Magnetic resonance imaging-guided microwave ablation of hepatic malignancies: Feasibility, efficacy, safety, and follow-up. J Can Res Ther [serial online] 2020 [cited 2020 Nov 24 ];16:1151-1156
Available from: https://www.cancerjournal.net/article.asp?issn=0973-1482;year=2020;volume=16;issue=5;spage=1151;epage=1156;aulast=Yang;type=0