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Cancer resilience in parents of children with cancer; the role of general health and self-efficacy on resiliency


1 Research Center of Environmental Pollutants, Qom University of Medical Sciences, Qom, Iran
2 Research Student Committee, Faculty of Health, Qom University of Medical Sciences, Qom, Iran
3 Research Center of Environmental Pollutants, Faculty of Health, Qom University of Medical Sciences, Qom, Iran

Correspondence Address:
Abolfazl Mohammadbeigi,
Research Center of Environmental Pollutants, Qom University of Medical Sciences, Qom
Iran
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None

DOI: 10.4103/jcrt.JCRT_464_19

Introduction: Cancer in children affect their parents to some stress and worries during treatment process. This study aimed to assess the parental adjustment on the resiliency of parents of children with cancer and its relationship with social support, self-efficacy, and general health. Materials and Methods: In a cross-sectional study, 107 parents of children with cancer were selected by convenience sampling method from the Oncology Departments of Qom Hospitals, Iran. Standard questionnaires including Phillips Social Support, Corner Davidson Resilience, Sheerer Self-Efficacy Inventory, and General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28) were used for data collection. Pearson's correlation coefficient, Chi–square test, t-test, and multivariate linear regression were used for data analysis in SPSS software. Results: A significant correlation was observed between cancer resilience and social support score (r = 0.285). Multivariate regression model Showed that social support was the most important predictor of cancer resilience (β =0.723, P = 0.045). In addition, self efficacy (β =0.356, P = 0.005) showed a direct relationship with cancer resilience. Nevertheless, an inverse association (β = -0.351, P = 0.025) was observed between GHQ score and cancer resilience in parents of children with cancer. Conclusion: Cancer resilience in families of children with cancer is significantly associated with higher social support, more self-efficacy, and better general health. Interventional programs aimed at increasing family resilience and reducing stress by increasing the social support and self-efficacy in patients' families are helpful and necessary.


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    -  Mohammadsalehi N
    -  Asgarian A
    -  Ghasemi M
    -  Mohammadbeigi A
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