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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 14  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 176-183

Association of glutathione S-transferase M1 polymorphisms in the colorectal cancer risk: A meta-analysis


1 Department of Pathophysiology, West China School of Basic Medical Sciences & Forensic Medicine, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan Province, China
2 Sichuan University-West China Medicine Technology Transfer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan Province, China
3 Department of Oncology, Chengdu First People's Hospital, Chengdu, Sichuan Province, China

Correspondence Address:
Prof. Ying Huang
Department of Pathophysiology, West China School of Basic Medical Sciences & Forensic Medicine, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, Sichuan Province
China
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jcrt.JCRT_446_16

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Purpose: The glutathione S-transferase M1 (GSTM1) as a member of phase II detoxification enzymes is expressed in many tissues and plays a critical role in preventing the occurrence of cancer. Published data regarding the associations between the GSTM1 polymorphism and colorectal cancer (CRC) risk are inconclusive. Materials and Methods: A meta-analysis of 55 case–control studies involving 17,498 cases and 26,441 controls were performed to assess the strength of association using odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI). Results: The meta-analysis of those studies suggested that GSTM1 null genotype was significantly associated with CRC risk (OR = 1.13, 95% CI = 1.06–1.20, P < 0.0001). In the subgroup analysis by ethnicity, significant risks were associated with GSTM1 null genotype in Caucasians (OR = 1.18, 95% CI = 1.07–1.29, P = 0.001), Asians (OR = 1.11, 95% CI = 1.02–1.22, P = 0.02), and mixed group (OR = 1.01, 95% CI = 0.90–1.14, P = 0.85). In the subgroup analysis by study design, significant elevated risks were associated with GSTM1 null genotype in hospital-based case–control study group (OR = 1.20, 95% CI = 1.10–1.31, and P < 0.0001) but not in population-based case–control study group (OR = 1.03, 95% CI = 0.96–1.10, P = 0.43). Conclusions: Based on our meta-analysis, the GSTM1 null genotype is a risk factor for CRC.


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