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BOOK REVIEW
Year : 2006  |  Volume : 2  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 148

Clinical target volumes in conformal and intensity modulated radiation therapy


Radiation Oncology, Tata Memorial Hospital, Parel, Mumbai - 400 012, India

Correspondence Address:
Anusheel Munshi
Radiation Oncology, Tata Memorial Hospital, Parel, Mumbai - 400 012
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


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How to cite this article:
Munshi A. Clinical target volumes in conformal and intensity modulated radiation therapy. J Can Res Ther 2006;2:148

How to cite this URL:
Munshi A. Clinical target volumes in conformal and intensity modulated radiation therapy. J Can Res Ther [serial online] 2006 [cited 2020 Oct 30];2:148. Available from: https://www.cancerjournal.net/text.asp?2006/2/3/148/27594

Conventional radiotherapy has surely and steadily paved the way for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D CRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Interest in IMRT has especially been on the rise, this, in spite of the fact that no firm guidelines for contouring structures on the CT slices are yet available. In this context, the book Clinical target volumes in conformal and intensity modulated radiation therapy by V. Gregoire, P. Scalliet and K. K. Ang is a timely attempt to fill the existing void.

The book aims at giving clinical target volumes to the radiation oncologist for use in the practice of radiation oncology. The authors have made an attempt to provide a framework for contouring in 3D CRT and IMRT of different sites. The book has been supplemented with high quality CT plates with multicolor target delineation and colored sectional diagrams. The written text is uniformly rich in style and substance.

However, the chapters are not evenly planned and while some sites have been discussed in appropriate detail, many important ones have been missed altogether. In GI malignancies, only esophagus and anorectal sites have been considered. CNS tumors have not been discussed at all. While the authors seem to have made an attempt to incorporate figures, the theoretical aspects of normal anatomical details often override the real focus of the book. This fact is strikingly evident in the first chapter (on the lymphatic system) of the book. Overall, the major focus of the book seems to be somehow on the lymphatic system and delineation of the lymph node regions, which has been dealt with fairly well. In the process, however, the primary tumor definition and delineation has taken an extreme backseat.

The chapters on breast cancer and esophageal tumors deserve mention for being well written and supplemented with relevant images and figures. However, the chapter on anorectal cancers has unnecessarily described conventional portals and conventional films for anorectal malignancies. The book ends with the chapter on the role of radiotherapy in lymphomas. This discusses the well-known facts about lymphomas but fails to provide any plate or image to aid contouring aspect. Also, the authors are completely silent on the delineation of GTV and the GTV-to-CTV margin for various sites and situations, an aspect that is hotly debated in the radiation oncology community.

To summarize, this book does enlighten regarding many aspects of contouring but stops well short of being a treatise for a radiation oncologist involved in 3D CRT and IMRT.


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