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Figure 2: Apoptotic cells detected by flow cytometry. (a) HepG2 cells were treated with curcumin-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers (Cur-NLC) and native curcumin at control, 2.5 mg/L, 10 mg/L, and 30 g/mL for 48 h, respectively. (b) The bar graph shows the effect of Cur-NLC and native curcumin on apoptosis of HepG2 cells. Data are presented as the mean ± standard deviation (SD) in triplicate by comparing between the treated and untreated control cells. #P < 0.05, ##P < 0.01 compared with the control group; *P < 0.05, **P < 0.01 compared with the empty nanoparticle treated group. (c) The apoptotic rate of Cur-NLC (2.5 mg/L and 10 mg/L) treatment showed the significant difference as compared with that of native curcumin groups. The results are expressed as the mean ± SD of three independent experiments. *P < 0.05, **P < 0.01 compared with native curcumin group

Figure 2: Apoptotic cells detected by flow cytometry. (a) HepG2 cells were treated with curcumin-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers (Cur-NLC) and native curcumin at control, 2.5 mg/L, 10 mg/L, and 30 g/mL for 48 h, respectively. (b) The bar graph shows the effect of Cur-NLC and native curcumin on apoptosis of HepG2 cells. Data are presented as the mean ± standard deviation (SD) in triplicate by comparing between the treated and untreated control cells. #<i>P</i> < 0.05, ##<i>P</i> < 0.01 compared with the control group; *<i>P</i> < 0.05, **<i>P</i> < 0.01 compared with the empty nanoparticle treated group. (c) The apoptotic rate of Cur-NLC (2.5 mg/L and 10 mg/L) treatment showed the significant difference as compared with that of native curcumin groups. The results are expressed as the mean ± SD of three independent experiments. *<i>P</i> < 0.05, **<i>P</i> < 0.01 compared with native curcumin group