Journal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics Close
 

Figure 1: Influence of diet on the intracerebral growth of the CT- 2A brain tumor. Dietary treatment was initiated 1 day after tumor implantation and was continued for 13 days. The visual representation (a) and quantitative assessment; (b) of the tumor growth in C57BL/6J mice receiving the standard high-carbohydrate diet (SD) or a ketogenic diet (KD) under either unrestricted (UR) or restricted (R) feeding as we described.[14,37] Values in B are expressed as means with 95% confidence intervals, and n = the number of mice examined in each group. The dry weights of the tumors in R groups were significantly lower than those in the UR groups at P < 0.01. The results show that DR significantly reduces tumor growth regardless of whether the calories come from carbohydrates or fat. No adverse effects were seen in the mice maintained on the 30-40% DR. Despite a reduction in total body weight, the DR-fed mice were more healthy and active than the AL-fed mice as assessed by ambulatory and grooming behavior. No signs of vitamin or mineral deficiency were observed in the DR.fed mice according to standard criteria for mice. These findings are consistent with the well-recognized health benefits of mild-to-moderate diet restriction in rodents[14,37] (reprinted from Figure 3, reference 14, with permission from Springer)

Figure 1: Influence of diet on the intracerebral growth of the CT- 2A brain tumor. Dietary treatment was initiated 1 day after tumor implantation and was continued for 13 days. The visual representation (a) and quantitative assessment; (b) of the tumor growth in C57BL/6J mice receiving the standard high-carbohydrate diet (SD) or a ketogenic diet (KD) under either unrestricted (UR) or restricted (R) feeding as we described.[14,37] Values in B are expressed as means with 95% confidence intervals, and n = the number of mice examined in each group. The dry weights of the tumors in R groups were significantly lower than those in the UR groups at P < 0.01. The results show that DR significantly reduces tumor growth regardless of whether the calories come from carbohydrates or fat. No adverse effects were seen in the mice maintained on the 30-40% DR. Despite a reduction in total body weight, the DR-fed mice were more healthy and active than the AL-fed mice as assessed by ambulatory and grooming behavior. No signs of vitamin or mineral deficiency were observed in the DR.fed mice according to standard criteria for mice. These findings are consistent with the well-recognized health benefits of mild-to-moderate diet restriction in rodents[14,37] (reprinted from Figure 3, reference 14, with permission from Springer)