Home About us Editorial board Ahead of print Current issue Search Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Contacts Login 


 
 Table of Contents  
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 12  |  Issue : 8  |  Page : 271-273

Effect of dezocine combined with propofol on painless gastroscopy in patients with suspect gastric carcinoma


1 Department of Endoscopy, Huaihe Hospital Henan University, Kaifeng Henan Province, Kaifeng 475000, PR China
2 Department of Anesthesiology, Huaihe Hospital Henan University, Kaifeng Henan Province, Kaifeng 475000, PR China

Date of Web Publication22-Feb-2017

Correspondence Address:
Donghang Zhang
Department of Endoscopy, Huaihe Hospital, Henan University, Kaifeng 475000
PR China
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0973-1482.200755

Rights and Permissions
 > Abstract 

Objective: To evaluate the effect of dezocine combined with propofol on painless gastroscopy in patients with suspect gastric carcinoma.
Methods: Forty-three patients with gastric carcinoma who have underwent painless gastroscopy were retrospectively analyzed. For the 43 patients, 21 patients received propofol 1 mg/kg for painless gastroscopy (control group) and other 22 cases received dezocine 20 µg/kg plus propofol 1 mg/kg for painless gastroscopy (experiment group). The vital indexes (heart rate [HR], respiratory rate [RR], mean arterial pressure [MAP], and SpO2%), side effects, and recovery time were recorded at the time point T1 (before dosing), T2 (disappearance of eyelash reflex), and T3 (recovery of orientation).
Results: The HR, RR, and MAP were significantly decreased in T2 compared to T1 in both experiment and control group (P < 0.05). However, the SpO2% was not changed at T1, T2, and T3 in both experiment and control groups (P > 0.05). The RR at T2 was 16.8 ± 2.1 (n/ min) and 14.2 ± 1.8 (n/min) for experiment and control groups, respectively, with statistical difference (P < 0.05). The incidence rate of respiratory depression and body movement was 0.0%, 27.3% for experiment and 23.8%, 47.6% for control group with statistical difference (P < 0.05). The recovery time was 3.6 ± 0.8 min and 1.8 ± 0.6 min for control and experiment group, respectively, which demonstrated experiment group is much shorter than that of control group with statistical difference (P < 0.05). However, nausea and vomiting rate was not statistically different between the experiment and control groups (P > 0.05).
Conclusion: Dezocine combined with propofol on painless gastroscopy can reduce the respiratory depression and body movement without interference of hemodynamics.

Keywords: Dezocine, gastric carcinoma, gastroscopy, propofol


How to cite this article:
Ma J, Zhang P, Zhang Y, Chen Z, Xin W, Zhang D, Ma C. Effect of dezocine combined with propofol on painless gastroscopy in patients with suspect gastric carcinoma. J Can Res Ther 2016;12:271-3

How to cite this URL:
Ma J, Zhang P, Zhang Y, Chen Z, Xin W, Zhang D, Ma C. Effect of dezocine combined with propofol on painless gastroscopy in patients with suspect gastric carcinoma. J Can Res Ther [serial online] 2016 [cited 2017 Aug 19];12:271-3. Available from: http://www.cancerjournal.net/text.asp?2016/12/8/271/200755

Ji Ma and Peng Zhang contributed equally to this work.



 > Introduction Top


Gastroscopy is a diagnostic endoscopic process that visualize s the upper part of the gastrointestinal tract up to the duodenum.[1],[2] It is a minimally invasive procedure because it does not require an incision into one of the major body cavities and does not require any significant recovery after the procedure.[3] However, for individual reasons, some patients feel serious nausea and vomiting during the procedure.[4] For these patients, the painless gastroscopy was generally undertaken with anesthetic drugs.[5] In this study, we retrospective analysis 43 patients with suspect gastric carcinoma who received painless gastroscopy to evaluate the clinical effect of dezocine combined with propofol on painless gastroscopy.


 > Materials and Methods Top


Patients selection

Forty-three patients with gastric carcinoma who have underwent painless gastroscopy were retrospectively analyzed in our hospital from January 2014 to February 2016. For the included 43 patients, 21 patients received propofol 1 mg/kg for painless gastroscopy (control group) and other 22 cases received dezocine 20 µg/kg plus propofol 1 mg/kg for painless gastroscopy (experiment group). The patient's inclusion criteria: (1) patients more than 18 years old; (2) patients with suspect gastric carcinoma; (3) received dezocine or dezocine plus propofol for painless gastroscopy; (4) with completed data such as heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR). The general characteristics of the two groups are shown in [Table 1].
Table 1: The main characteristics of the two groups

Click here to view


Anesthesia methods

All patients included in this study were fasting for 6 h, 4 h before receiving painless gastroscopy. After entering the endoscopy room, the patients were given odium lactate Ringer's injection 250 mL, intravenous glucose tolerance test and oxygen inhalation through nasal catheter with 3 L/min. Patients in the control group received propofol 1 mg/kg, and patients in the experiment group received dezocine 20 µg/kg plus propofol 1 mg/kg for painless gastroscopy. The vital indexes (HR, RR, mean arterial pressure [MAP], and SpO2%), side effects, and recovery time were recorded at the time point T1 (before dosing), T2 (disappearance of eyelash reflex), and T3 (recovery of orientation).

Statistical method

Statistical analysis was done by STATA10.0 (http://www.stata.com) software. Values were expressed as mean ± standard deviation. Differences between groups were calculated using the Student's t-test. Count data were expressed by n (%). Differences between groups were calculated by Chi-square test. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant.


 > Results Top


Vital indexes

The HR, RR, and MAP were significantly decreased in T2 compared to T1 in both experiment and control groups (P < 0.05). However, the SpO2% was not changed at T1, T2, and T3 in both experiment and control groups (P > 0.05). The RR at T2 were 16.8 ± 2.1 (n/min) and 14.2 ± 1.8 (n/min) for experiment and control groups, respectively, with statistical difference (P < 0.05) [Table 2].
Table 2: The vital indexes comparison of the two groups (x̄±s)

Click here to view


Side effects and recovery

The incidence rate of respiratory depression and body movement were 0.0%, 27.3% for experiment and 23.8%, 47.6% for control group with statistical difference (P < 0.05). The recovery time was 3.6 ± 0.8 min and 1.8 ± 0.6 min for control and experiment groups, respectively, which demonstrated experiment group is much shorter than that of control group with statistical difference (P < 0.05). However, nausea and vomiting rate were not statistically different between the experiment and control groups (P > 0.05) [Table 3].
Table 3: The side effects and recovery time of the two groups

Click here to view



 > Discussion Top


In recent years, painless electronic gastroscopy was widely used in the clinical reducing the sufferings of patients who received the gastroscopy.[1],[6] At present, the generally used anesthetic drug was propofol. Propofol is a short-acting drug that results in a decreased level of consciousness and lack of memory for events.[7] It was used in the starting and maintenance of general anesthesia, sedation for mechanically ventilated adults, and procedural sedation. However, because of lacking obvious analgesic effect, the dosage of propofol was relative high in the procedure of painless gastroscopy. However, high dosage propofol usually causes inhibitory effect on respiratory and cardiovascular system. Ljubicic found that dezocine combined with propofol on painless gastroscopy can decrease propofol dosage and risk of developing inhibitory effect on respiratory and cardiovascular system without decreasing the sedative and analgesic effect.[8] Dezocine belongs to opioid receptor antagonists drugs. It can exert analgesic effect in spinal cord with mild respiratory depression.[9]

In our study, we included 43 patients who received painless gastroscopy and found that the HR, RR, and MAP were significantly decreased in T2 compared to T1 in both experiment and control groups (P < 0.05). This means that dezocine combined with propofol or propofol alone both can affect the respiratory and circulatory system. However, the SpO2% was not changed at T1, T2, and T3 in both experiment and control groups (P > 0.05). Dezocine combined with propofol or propofol alone had no effects on the SpO2. The RR at T2 was 16.8 ± 2.1 (n/min) and 14.2 ± 1.8 (n/min) for experiment and control groups, respectively, with statistical difference (P < 0.05). The incidence rate of respiratory depression and body movement were 0.0%, 27.3% for experiment and 23.8%, 4.8 for control group with statistical difference (P < 0.05). The recovery time was 3.6 ± 0.8 min and 1.8 ± 0.6 min for control and experiment groups, respectively, which demonstrated experiment group is much shorter than that of control group with statistical difference (P < 0.05). However, nausea and vomiting rate were not statistically different between the experiment and control groups (P > 0.05). These results indicated that dezocine combined with propofol on painless gastroscopy can reduce the respiratory depression and body movement without interference of hemodynamics. However, the statistical power was week because of only 43 cases were included in this study. Multicenter prospective randomized studies were needed to further discuss the clinical effect of dezocine combined with propofol on painless gastroscopy in patients with suspect gastric carcinoma.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

 
 > References Top

1.
Kim JH, Eun HW, Hong SS, Auh YH. Early gastric cancer: Virtual gastroscopy. Abdom Imaging 2006;31:507-13.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Liu J, Wang B, Hu W, Sun P, Li J, Duan H, et al. Global and local panoramic views for gastroscopy: An assisted method of gastroscopic lesion surveillance. IEEE Trans Biomed Eng 2015;62:2296-307.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Kapp H. Gastroscopy. Schweiz Med Wochenschr 1963;93:1354-7.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Lapalus MG, Saurin JC. Complications of gastrointestinal endoscopy: Gastroscopy and colonoscopy. Gastroenterol Clin Biol 2003;27:909-21.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Del Pozo García AJ, Gisbert JP. Is the string test a useful alternative to gastroscopy with biopsy for H. pylori identification? Rev Esp Enferm Dig 2006;98:542-9.  Back to cited text no. 5
    
6.
Jiang Z, Wu X, Liu Y, Ma Z. Reflux-preventing face mask designed for painless gastroscopy. J Clin Anesth 2012;24:432.  Back to cited text no. 6
    
7.
Kiriyama S, Naitoh H, Kuwano H. Propofol sedation during endoscopic treatment for early gastric cancer compared to midazolam. World J Gastroenterol 2014;20:11985-90.  Back to cited text no. 7
    
8.
Ljubicic N, Supanc V, Roic G, Sharma M. Efficacy and safety of propofol sedation during urgent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy – A prospective study. Coll Antropol 2003;27:189-95.  Back to cited text no. 8
    
9.
O'Brien JJ, Benfield P, Dezocine. A preliminary review of its pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties, and therapeutic efficacy. Drugs 1989;38:226-48.  Back to cited text no. 9
    



 
 
    Tables

  [Table 1], [Table 2], [Table 3]



 

Top
 
 
  Search
 
Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
Access Statistics
Email Alert *
Add to My List *
* Registration required (free)

  >Abstract>Introduction>Materials and Me...>Results>Discussion>Article Tables
  In this article
>References

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed515    
    Printed0    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded61    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal


[TAG2]
[TAG3]
[TAG4]