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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 12  |  Issue : 5  |  Page : 27-29

Oxycodone versus dezocine for postoperative analgesia in patients with cervical cancer treated with radical surgery


1 Department of Anesthesiology, Lishui People's Hospital, Lishui, Zhejiang 323000, PR China
2 Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Lishui People's Hospital, Lishui, Zhejiang 323000, PR China

Date of Web Publication7-Oct-2016

Correspondence Address:
Honglian Wu
Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Lishui People's Hospital, Lishui, Zhejiang 323000
PR China
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0973-1482.191624

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 > Abstract 


Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate oxycodone versus dezocine for postoperative analgesia in patients with cervical cancer treated with radical surgery.
Materials and Methods: Fifty-one cases of cervical cancer treated with radical surgery were included in the present study and divided into oxycodone group (n = 26) and dezocine group (n = 25). Patients in the oxycodone group were given with oxycodone 1 mg/kg plus tropisetron 0.1 mg/kg diluting to 100 ml by 0.9% saline for patient-controlled intravenous analgesia (PCIA) after surgery. Moreover, patients in the dezocine group were given with dezocine 0.6 mg/kg plus tropisetron 0.1 mg/kg diluting to 100 ml by 0.9% saline for PCIA after surgery. The visual analog scale (VAS) and Ramsay sedation score of the two groups were recorded in the time point of 4, 8, 12, 24, and 48 h after surgery. The adverse event-related drugs were recorded and compared between the two groups.
Results: The VAS score was significantly lower in oxycodone group compared to dezocine group in the time point of 4, 8, 12, 24, and 48 h (Pall < 0.05). The Ramsay score at time point of 4, 8, 12, 24 h, and 48 h were obviously higher in oxycodone group than those in dezocine group (P < 0.05) which indicated that the sedative effect in oxycodone group was superior to dezocine. For oxycodone group, there were six cases (23.08%) with nausea and one case (3.85) with vomiting in the treatment procedure. Moreover, for dezocine group, there were one case (4.00%) with nausea, two cases (8.00%) with vomiting, and two cases (8.00%) with dizzy in the treatment procedure. There was no statistical difference of adverse event risk between the two groups (P > 0.05).
Conclusion: Oxycodone postoperative analgesia is superior to dezocine for patients with cervical cancer treated with radical surgery.

Keywords: Cervical cancer, dezocine, oxycodone, postoperative analgesia


How to cite this article:
Li Z, Wu H, He R, Hu X, Liu S. Oxycodone versus dezocine for postoperative analgesia in patients with cervical cancer treated with radical surgery. J Can Res Ther 2016;12:27-9

How to cite this URL:
Li Z, Wu H, He R, Hu X, Liu S. Oxycodone versus dezocine for postoperative analgesia in patients with cervical cancer treated with radical surgery. J Can Res Ther [serial online] 2016 [cited 2018 Aug 16];12:27-9. Available from: http://www.cancerjournal.net/text.asp?2016/12/5/27/191624




 > Introduction Top


Pain is a physiological response of the body. Postoperative pain, a kind of strong response to trauma for patients who received surgical treatment, can not only increase the patients' stress and oxygen consumption but also increase the risk of developing related complications.[1] Hence, the pain control after surgery is most important especially for female whose pain threshold was relatively low compared to male.[2] In our study, we compared the clinical efficacy and adverse events of oxycodone

versus dezocine for postoperative analgesia in patients of cervical cancer treated with radical surgery.


 > Materials and Methods Top


Patients selection

Fifty-one cases of cervical cancer treated with radical surgery were included in this study from July 2014 to December 2015 and divided into oxycodone group (n = 26) and dezocine group (n = 25). All patients were restricted to the American Society of Anesthesiologists I-II and pathology confirmed of cervical carcinoma. The mean age of patients in oxycodone group was 58.6 ± 12.9 years with the mean weight of 50.6 ± 6.1 kg. The mean age of patients in dezocine group was 57.4 ± 13.1 years with the mean weight of (51.6 ± 5.8) kg. The general characteristics of age and weight in the two groups were not statistical different (P > 0.05).

Methods

Patients with cervical cancer preparing for radical surgery were given oxygen inhalation (2 L/min) when entering the operation room. The electrocardiogram, pulse, and oxygen saturation monitoring were used to monitor the patients' vital signs. After satisfaction anesthesia, the patients received radical surgery for cervical cancer. Thirty minutes after surgery, the patients were given patient-controlled intravenous analgesia (PCIA). For the oxycodone group, oxycodone 1 mg/kg plus tropisetron 0.1 mg/kg diluting to 100 ml by 0.9% saline for PCIA was given to patients. For the dezocine group, dezocine 0.6 mg/kg plus tropisetron 0.1 mg/kg diluting to 100 ml by 0.9% saline for PCIA was given. PCIA was set with a continuous infusion of 2 mL/h with a single additional dose of 1 mL. The visual analog scale (VAS) and Ramsay sedation score of the two groups were recorded in the time point of 4, 8, 12, 24, and 48 h after surgery. The adverse event-related drugs were recorded and compared between the two groups.

Statistical analysis

The statistical analysis was done by SPSS version 17.0 software (http://www-01.ibm.com/software/analytics/spss/). Data were expressed as mean ± standard deviation or n (%) where appropriate. The differences between the two groups for metrical and quantitative data were tested by independent samples t-test and Chi-square test. Two-tailed P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant.


 > Results Top


Visual analog scale comparison

The mean visual analog pain score for oxycodone and dezocine group is shown in [Table 1], which indicated that VAS score was significantly lower in oxycodone group compared to dezocine group in the time point of 4, 8, 12, 24, and 48 h (Pall < 0.05).
Table 1: The postoperative visual analog scale score comparison between the two groups

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Ramsay score comparison

The Ramsay score at time point of 4, 8, 12, and 24 h was obviously higher in oxycodone group than those in dezocine group (P < 0.05) which indicated that the sedative effect in oxycodone group was superior to dezocine [Table 2].
Table 2: The postoperative Ramsay score comparison between the two groups

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Adverse event

For oxycodone group, there were six cases (23.08%) with nausea, one case (3.85) with vomiting in the treatment procedure. Moreover, for dezocine group, there were one case (4.00%) with nausea, two cases (8.00%) with vomiting, and two cases (8.00%) with dizzy in the treatment procedure. There was no statistical difference of adverse event risk between two groups [P > 0.05, [Table 3].
Table 3: The adverse event incidence rate between the two groups

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 > Discussion Top




As an important postoperative analgesia technique, intravenous self-control analgesia can be controlled by patients themselves according to their own feel of pain.[3] It is generally used for postoperative pain management and for end-stage cancer patients.[4],[5] With a PCIA, the patient is protected from overdose by the caregiver.[6] Thus, postoperative analgesia drugs can be maintained at the lowest concentration for patients received PCIA.[7] In this study, we evaluated clinical efficacy and adverse event of oxycodone versus dezocine for postoperative analgesia in patients with cervical cancer treated with radical surgery. We found that the VAS score was significantly lower in oxycodone group compared to dezocine group in the time point of 4, 8, 12, 24, and 48 h (Pall < 0.05). The Ramsay score at time point of 4, 8, 12, 24, and 48 h were obviously higher in oxycodone group than those in dezocine group (P < 0.05) which indicated that the sedative effect in oxycodone group was superior to dezocine. Moreover, there was no statistical difference of adverse event risk between the two groups (P > 0.05). The results demonstrated that oxycodone postoperative analgesia is superior to dezocine for patients with cervical cancer treated with radical surgery. However, only 51 cases were included in this study, which made the statistical power limited.[8] Hence, multicentric prospective, randomized controlled trials for further evaluation of oxycodone versus dezocine for postoperative analgesia in patients with cervical cancer treated with radical surgery is needed, which can provide more powerful clinical evidence.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

 
 > References Top

1.
Medrzycka-Dabrowska W, Dabrowski S, Basinski A. Problems and barriers in ensuring effective acute and post-operative pain management – An international perspective. Adv Clin Exp Med 2015;24:905-10.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Schofield PA. The assessment and management of peri-operative pain in older adults. Anaesthesia 2014;69 Suppl 1:54-60.  Back to cited text no. 2
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3.
Azad SC, Groh J, Beyer A, Schneck D, Dreher E, Peter K. Continuous peridural analgesia vs patient – Controlled intravenous analgesia for pain therapy after thoracotomy. Anaesthesist 2000;49:9-17.  Back to cited text no. 3
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4.
Van de Velde M. Patient-controlled intravenous analgesia remifentanil for labor analgesia: Time to stop, think and reconsider. Curr Opin Anaesthesiol 2015;28:237-9.  Back to cited text no. 4
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5.
Mercadante S. Intravenous patient-controlled analgesia and management of pain in post-surgical elderly with cancer. Surg Oncol 2010;19:173-7.  Back to cited text no. 5
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6.
Xue FS, Liu GP, Sun C, Li RP. Comparing postoperative outcomes for epidural versus intravenous patient-controlled analgesia. Reg Anesth Pain Med 2015;40:639.  Back to cited text no. 6
    
7.
Mizuno J, Morita S, Hanaue N, Hanaoka K, Yokoyama T. Intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV-PCA) for relief of postoperative pain. Masui 2011;60:908-12.  Back to cited text no. 7
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8.
Zhou Y, Huang JX, Lu XH, Zhang YF, Zhang W. Patient-controlled intravenous analgesia for non-small cell lung cancer patient after thoracotomy. J Cancer Res Ther 2015;11 Suppl 1:C128-30.  Back to cited text no. 8
[PUBMED]    



 
 
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  [Table 1], [Table 2], [Table 3]



 

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